What concepts can you derive from this image?

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December 18, 2018

There is a visually easy way of seeing regeneration "happen" through these images. Processes of exclusion, expulsion, and eviction are visualized through the juxtaposed construction. The way in which infrastructure allows for a restructuring of space is key in this image. The two arches (one in each picture) give me a sense of attempted continuity. The removal of any Chinese architectural legacy from the new station brutally deletes history. The fact that the new building looks like a church reminds me of colonial impositions of creed.

It is harder to see how toxicity becomes part of the analysis and I would be very interested in hearing more about what the author dubs “toxic vulnerabilities.”

December 14, 2018
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That floral freeway headdress: what an image! I read this as a celebration of constriction: the visible demands that this absurd headdress exerts upon the body and mind of the woman modeling it, the knot of freeway overpasses and underpasses, the snarl of traffic. Is the aestheticization of these multiple levels of constriction perhaps an act of cultural self-justification and defense against critique?

We ("we") southern Californians circa 1962, the argument might go, we bear up so gracefully under the pressures of self-presentation and built environment and mobility. Can you really ask much more of us -- socially, economically, environmentally? I mean things are tough enough as it is -- look at what we're dealing with, headdress-wise.

December 8, 2018
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Contained disarray.

December 6, 2018
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Toxic Silence?

December 6, 2018
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Particularly interesting is locating what Ariel calls the "intimate ways freeways normalize specific daily activity." While not factoring prominently in any spectacular form, the can of "Steel Reserve" appears to be suspended in time over the constant motion below. The can may initially be seen as a discarded piece of trash, revealing an environmental toxicity (trash) juxtaposed against another environmental toxicity (pollution, land expropriation). But, the can may also reveal something less spectacular and more intimate. It may be an artifact of suspended time; of leisurely time perhaps. While not diminishing it as a piece of trash and as such its environmental consequences, the can may also narrate an affect where the can, the overpass, and the freeway beneath serve as a stolen moment in time for a passerby. Like Ariel, who took the photograph while walking his dog, a passerby may have taken a stroll to enjoy a moment suspended above the 210 freeway. The humming sounds of the cars moving below may drown out many demands of daily life. The malt liquor could possibly be seen then as a stolen moment in an otherwise fleeting temporality. This moment however, is confronted by the concrete structures, land expropriation, and pollution resulting from the freeway. The moment of leisure obscures the toxicity of the location. The passerby while decompressing from the everyday must do so at the expense of an environmental hazard.

December 5, 2018

One of the strongest elements in this work, for me, is the potential for this project to illustrate, ethnographically, new configurations around property, value, etc. based on these new forms of infrastructure DNA, which is the data infused in zip codes and area codes and addresses. These living, public biometrics are measured in terms of exposure and this informatic shows that. Rather than walkability, is there an air quality measurement in the property's portfolio? Will there be soil samples as part of the house tour? I think this image carries a lot of hypotheticals about the future. How might databases respond to new needs and metrics? How might this be used to deter unstable development?

December 5, 2018

This image shows a bird's eye view of toxicity. However, I wonder how we can better incorporate the human element into these scales. Could we collage it with data on hospital visits, pharmacy records for asthma medications, emergency room visits for difficulty breathing? 

December 5, 2018
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As you identify in the last bullet of your design statement, "the simplicification of ontology has led to the enormous complication of epistemology." As with your "Toxic Family Tree" visualization, I wonder how one might demystify the content of this visual so that it's also more legible to non-specialists. As a historian, you might already know the ongoing debates within and objectives of digital humanities. To this end, I ask, how does this image make legible information, knowledge, or insight that is otherwise impossible to articule? 

December 5, 2018

I find this collection and collage very interesting for this primary reason: It takes charts, graphs, stat's, and other "classic" informatics, and plays with them in such a way as to both utilize as well as question the information therein. At first it seems like a collection of information in visual formats, but it is a toppling array of chaos and structural violence. Indeed, without the text, it is more difficult to plug in the role of the dominos, but the array of info in and of itself creates a dizzying, confusing, and unsettling affect, which is a critical point to make as publics try and sift through policy, law, facts, and protocol at the same time as sifting through rubble. Publics are tasked with either understanding health risks at the same time as accepting the fact that our very own behavior contrinutes to crises.

This shifting squares in the collage, a nod to De Stijl, as you mention, is likened to channels, websites, and flashes/ screens of information, which may or may not be congruent. There is an imbalance here, and I think that is successful. It feels ethnograohically dense is its considerations as health and air and stats are paired with personal images and geo-sptail considerations.

December 4, 2018

This is a powerful image in several ways. The story it tells is a realistic portrayal of the past which foreshadows the racism that is still prevalent today. The dated look of the visual adds to the overall feeling that the reader experiences while looking at and reading the image. Lynching as an action produces profound feelings for the reader especially since this is no longer a regular occurrence (shootings on the other hand...). The accompanying text adds to the article by bringing in some backstory and showing both sides of the situation. Overall an excellent visualization. I was a little confused with the term technologies, as in "technologies of control". Was lynching the "technology of control?" (I am new to anthro, so this might totally make sense, I am just not there yet).

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