Janelle Levy, "Kingston As City And Plantation: The Racial Organization Of Space In A Black Atlantic City"

Text

Having a population of over 90% African descent, Jamaica is easily described as a Black Nation. However, the logic of its colonial past which are embedded in its institutions and built environment are patently Anti-Black. Much like a plantation, Jamaica's capital, Kingston, is not distinguished in the existence of black life everywhere within the cityscape. Rather, racial hegemony is defined by the very few places deemed fit for non-Black life. This paper explores how race and space are articulated through the segregation of Jamaica's elite non-Black population and how non-Black life is regarded as not only exception but exceptional.

Anti-Blackness; the Caribbean; Elites; ruination and nonplaces

License

Creative Commons Licence

Contributed date

February 5, 2020 - 3:43am

Critical Commentary

Janelle Levy is a third-year Ph.D. student in the Department of Anthropology at the University of California, Irvine. A native of Kingston, Jamaica, Janelle received her B.A. inĀ  Anthropology from the University of Central Florida. She is currently working towards qualifying for doctoral candidacy.

Cite as

Danielle Yorleny Tassara, "Janelle Levy, "Kingston As City And Plantation: The Racial Organization Of Space In A Black Atlantic City"", contributed by Danielle Yorleny Tassara and Kaitlyn Rabach, Center for Ethnography, Platform for Experimental Collaborative Ethnography, last modified 5 February 2020, accessed 9 May 2021.