How does your eye move around the image? Where did you first focus, where does your gaze end up?

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December 4, 2018

my eye moves from top to bottom, seemingly viewing the "stabilization of mercury" through the images 

December 4, 2018

In all honesty, prior to reading the text I was unsure how to digest this image. The center image of the dominoe seemed to stand out (though on initial reading not in a way that was signifing of how to "read" the image). I then noticed the varying charts and wondered if (how) it was important for me to understand the graphic details of the charts within the image.

Andrew McGrath's picture
December 4, 2018
In response to:

I cannot shake the thought that this might function as part of a larger collage. In looking, I am immediately drawn to the violence of the Marine chopping the wood which has morphed in situ to a village scape. Everything here is abrupt visually and from my POV begs for an opening up of narrative and context. That said, it does flow with the previous image's thematics, and again the text font choice, for me, alludes to an absurdity of horrrors manifest in the relationship between USAID and the island.

December 4, 2018

my eye first goes to the two boys, a gaze channeled by those converging walls, a displaced reminder of all the walls of Gaza and Palestine.  The boys are split, cut by the line of the horizon. then the garbage, on its way to the sea, if it ever gets there. the frozen seagulls suggest the only motion, but it's a chaotic motion that goes nowhere.  You can't see left or right; those walls seem new and sturdy and uncrumbled, built to last.  The garbage was there but I focused on it last, I think.

December 4, 2018

what's interesting to me about this image is not so much how my eye moved as how hard it had to work to read.  which is apprrpriate to the distance in time in play here -- reading from the present to the mid-19th century.  You have to resad it word by word, stopping and pondering and guessing and reading back and forward and revising your reading.  We don't "see" print like this anymore and that makes it harder to read casually or transparently -- "naturally."  Maybe it's an example of how to "toxify" text, or at least highlight its pharmakonic qualities of poison/gift, obscuring/showing: we're forced to confront the alien materiality of what usually passes as "information"

December 3, 2018

My eye first focuses on the “One in four” title. It moves down to the children walking across the screen and I perceive that one of them is red. At this point, I perceive the police force that I have noticed above the “One in 4” image as protective of the children. My eye moves up to focus in on the “protecting the children” image. My brain automatically assumes that these police officers are the protective force of the children below. However, I then perceive what the ‘one in four’ caption refers to. This is an incredible effective and disturbing juxtaposition because of the way I perceive hierarchy in images. With the fisheye perspective on the police force and the way they are positioned higher than the LAPD school children below them, I am apt to see the police force, again, as protective and (paternalistic) caregivers to the children below. However, the impact of the statistics (1 in 4 children arrested by LASPD are middle school aged youth) is incredibly disturbing. This is a powerful juxtaposition.

 

December 3, 2018
In response to:

My eye is drawn to the debris and then through the space to walk through between two small embankments; then toward the horizon of scattered trees and the tilt of the landscape through the framing aslant.  My eye ends on the muddy water pool to the right.

December 3, 2018

Eye goes from lower right (with the bottle) to the horizon, aka the muddy water.  The critical essay pulls me back to the specifics of the bottle's illustration, in (deliberate?) parallel to the way the sequence of the first image--It's Elemental--to the second image--Matador--also moves focus from the global to the local field site.  

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