Describe your immediate reception or impression of this image (visceral, emotional, intellectual)?

Annotations

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December 4, 2018

I find the image aesthetically pleasing. It's composition is simple and clear. It presents mercury as a transformative, and powerful substance. 

December 4, 2018

My first reaction to this image was curiosity. The image itself doesn't give much away; however, the use of text helps the reader understand what they are looking at. Perhaps the text could be more powerful with a particular situation of police oppression - although that might just as easily take away from all the other oppressions that were experienced. The best part about this image/text is the awareness that it spreads to readers about a topic they might not know about or might have chosen to forget about. Great job!

December 4, 2018

My first reaction to this image was curiosity. The image itself doesn't give much away; however, the use of text helps the reader understand what they are looking at. Perhaps the text could be more powerful with a particular situation of police oppression - although that might just as easily take away from all the other oppressions that were experienced. The best part about this image/text is the awareness that it spreads to readers about a topic they might not know about or might have chosen to forget about. Great job!

December 4, 2018

Distracted and dispersed. It's unclear what the eye is to be drawn to in the image. My gaze felt dispersed in an unproductive way. But perhaps this dispersal suggests the dispersal and permeation of toxicity in the landscape, perhaps there is no singular focus or area of concentration. 

Andrew McGrath's picture
December 4, 2018

I appreciate your collapsing of time to illustrate what changes, and what stays when talking about housing in particular. For instance, I could hear an argument for attuning to humanity itself when considering discourse surrounding homelessness. However, with this image, you focus not only the juxtaposition of time, but also the infrastructural presence of homeless communities, not through human bodies, but through the tents that house them. 

Andrew McGrath's picture
December 4, 2018
In response to:

The power of this picture is entangled with the narrative of your text as well as my familiarity with the disgusting denials posited by the president after being given evidence of our national negligence. Using the picture of the cemetery does give me as a viewer an acknowledgement of the need for material and corporeal accounting in Puerto Rico. I am curious as to its affective resonance with you? Does it capture the viscerality of the lost not being counted? Is this necessary here, or are you pulling for something else?

December 4, 2018
In response to:

I appreciated how the image brought about a strong affective response. While there is an element of humour in this image (and this is nice because it forms a continuous affective arc along with the Trump image) there also exists a feeling of anger and disappointment. I like how this image can convey multiple affects that exists around the topic of toxicity and colonialsim. 

December 4, 2018

oh, emotional.  But where the caption recuperates some positive readings centered on the boys, I confess I can't or at least didn't see it: it doesn't suggest anything about leisure or joy to me, even if fleeting, although I recognize the possibility.  It's all about the experience of confinement, and the sea offers no escape or comfort.

December 3, 2018

The image of the police officer playing connect 4 with the young boy in touching. I want to relish in this captured moment in which male police officers and the boy (who is normally the subject of policing) have a moment of intimate connection. It is almost a representation of a father-son moment in which the police officer has the opportunity to have fun with a young boy, while also teaching him something about life. However, despite the egalitarian nature of this image, the statistics on the right show the actual inequality of the relationship between the police force and the public school child who, one might imagine, could be interrogated by the police officer without the child's parents even knowing about it.

 

December 3, 2018

The image feels too familiar. In disability studies we see too often the ways people with disabilities are positioned as naive children in need of guardianship. That comes across in the LASPD Facebook image. And it is a shocking contrast with the statistical information provided next to it.

 

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